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Asopao recipe

Courtesy of Stacy Sarabia. Find more recipes at stacysarabia.com.

Bowl of asopao with corn on the top

Shrimp marinade

  • 1 lb. medium sized shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • Adobo seasoning
  • 2 sazon packets (Goya brand is best)
  • 4 tbls. Olive oil

Other ingredients

  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 yellow pepper, diced
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, minced
  • ½ yellow onion, small dice
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1 cup green onions, chopped
  • 2 cups parboiled rice (or long grain)
  • 3 cups chicken stock (or broth)
  • 2 cups water
  • 8 oz. can tomato sauce
  • ¼ cup Sofrito
  • 1 tbls. oregano
  • 2. tbls. paprika
  • 2 tsp. cumin
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 4 small corn on the cob pieces (optional)
  • cilantro
  • salt/pepper (to taste)

Directions

Marinate the shrimp with the seasonings and 2 tbls. of oil for about 5-10 minutes. Meanwhile heat a large pot on the stove with the other 2 tbls. of olive oil. Add the shrimp, Sofrito, peppers, onions, spices and oregano. Heat for about 5 minutes then add the tomatoes, tomato sauce, stock and water. Bring to a boil. Add rice and cook for about 20-25 minutes on the medium-low heat. Once the liquid starts to thicken, add the corn, cook for another 10 minutes. Add the peas and cilantro and cook for 10 more minutes covered. ENJOY!

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A Seasoned Approach

Disability Center staffer is also a trained chef

Story and photo by Sarah Sabatke
Published Jan. 20, 2017

Stacy Sarabia portrait

Stacy Sarabia, Disability Center administrative assistant, is also a trained chef. She shares her recipes on her blog at stacysarabia.com.

Stacy Sarabia made her home in the kitchen at a young age.                                        

“I would be in my Grandma’s kitchen making experiments [when I was younger]… just, like, throwing stuff together. And then as I got older, my mom would have me make stuff,” Sarabia says. 

About five years ago, she took her love for food to the next level by pursuing culinary school, a dream she had previously put on hold. She looked at schools in Kansas City, St. Louis and Tulsa, and enrolled in L’Ecole Culinaire in St. Louis in September 2012. The program involved hands-on classes, working on a food truck, and even cooking for a local event hosted by the rapper Nelly.

“I made Spanish rice for them,” said Sarabia, “and I could say ‘Oh, I got to cook for Nelly!’ ”

While culinary school might seem glamorous, she explained that it was not without its bumps, like the stress of working in the school’s restaurant.

“The first day there, it was pretty much like Hell’s Kitchen,” Sarabia says. “He was yelling, I had no idea what we were doing — it was my first day in the restaurant part and I’m like, ‘I don’t know if I can handle this.’ ”

After finishing the year-long accelerated program in August 2013, Sarabia moved back to Columbia and was hired with the MU Disability Center as the center’s office support assistant. In October 2015, she was promoted to administrative assistant.

“It’s really made me, I think, grow as an employee, just because I’ve learned a lot more than I’ve ever done in a job before,” she said.

Since she moved into her current position, the Disability Center has transitioned to using MyAccess — a new online system to aid with scheduling consultations and providing accommodations. Sarabia has been charged with creating a guide for a new system and maintaining the office’s website.

“There’s something new every single day, which is good because it keeps me busy,” she said.

Sarabia continues to cook just for the fun of it, documenting her creations in her blog, “Life's Simple Measures,” at stacysarabia.com.

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Published by the Division of Student Affairs, 211 Jesse Hall, Columbia, MO 65211 | Phone: 573-882-6776 | Fax: 573-882-0158 | E-mail: StudentAffairs@missouri.edu

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Last updated: Aug. 7, 2017